The Impact of Labour Changes on Project Management Deliverables in the Healthcare and Social Care Sectors

5. 20. 2024
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This research examines the impact of fluctuations in the employment market on project management in the healthcare and social care industries. The study analyses the possible ramifications of these alterations on forthcoming results and provides crucial perspectives for Project Managers (PM) and stakeholders. The article examines many shifts in the labor market, including the use of new technology and changes in the demographic makeup of the workforce. The article also discusses strategies and benchmarks for achieving outstanding outcomes in order to mitigate undesirable repercussions and enhance the project's success. The study emphasizes the importance of skilled leadership and effective cooperation in overseeing employee schedules and achieving successful project outcomes across all industries.

Keywords: Labour Market, Team management, Teamwork, Workforce development, Project management success, Project management failure Project Team, Project fulfillment.

Author: Cynthia Eniye Bazuaye-Okunbor

 

Acronym Table

 

 

Centralized Workforce Governance

CWG

Holistic Well-being Integration

HWI

Integrated Healthcare Project Management Model

IHPMM

Project Manager

PM

Skill Adaptation Strategies

SAS

 

Introduction

            The primary emphasis of our work is the pressing issue of implementing significant changes in healthcare project management. This necessitates a reevaluation of the workforce's demographic composition, skill sets, and project management approaches in the industry. The factors driving these changes include advancements in technology, increasing patient demands, and regulatory obligations.

               Project teams working on healthcare initiatives need specialised expertise owing to the intricate nature of these projects. We further elaborate on the existing discoveries, recognising the significance of centralised frameworks, specific geographical centres, and defined protocols in optimising team effectiveness and unity. Previous research, as shown by the studies conducted by Smith et al. (2018) and Brealey et al. (1977), emphasises the detrimental impact of a decentralised strategy on the outcomes of healthcare programmes.                           

            Our study aims to delve further into the intricate relationship between workforce modifications and project management outcomes, building upon the existing knowledge. The dynamic nature of the healthcare industry necessitates a comprehensive examination of the workforce, marked by a growing need for specific knowledge and collaboration across several disciplines. With the continuous advancements in medical technology and the increasing complexity of healthcare delivery, project managers must adapt their approach to include digital solutions and telehealth platforms. Furthermore, the shift of the industry towards value-based care models and patient-centered approaches requires project managers to prioritise outcomes and actions aimed at improving quality throughout their planning and execution processes. 

            The objective of the research is to examine the influence of labour modifications on the achievement of project management outcomes in the healthcare and social care industries.

Literature Review

                The motivation behind our research is to get a comprehensive comprehension of and efficiently address the consequences of workforce adjustments on healthcare project management. Changes in workforce numbers, needed skills, job duties, and activities may lead to potential project disruptions and inefficiencies. The lack of centralization, geographical centres, and agreed-upon norms may lead to uncertainty, hindering the effectiveness of communication and collaboration among team members.

            The aim of our research is to provide significant insights on how to tackle and diminish these issues, offering project managers proactive strategies to efficiently navigate the intricacies of healthcare project management.

            In a recent study done by Smith et al. (2018), the researchers highlighted the impact of decentralisation on both work efficiency and team cohesiveness. Brealey et al. (1977) emphasised the need of using defined criteria to assure consistency, high quality output, and adherence to project deadlines. While these studies provide basic information, our research aims to improve understanding by examining the specific consequences of changes in the labour force on project outcomes in the healthcare business.

             By conducting a comprehensive analysis, our aim is to identify the potential hindrances associated with the recruitment and retention of highly skilled staff, the escalated expenses arising from the utilisation of temporary workers, and the prospective setbacks in project schedules. The key terms associated with the examined matter are workforce magnitude, skill prerequisites, decentralisation, project disruptions, and standardised criteria. These statements exemplify the complexities involved in the subject of healthcare project management. 

                   The objective of our research is to enhance the terminology used to discuss these subjects, providing a more comprehensive understanding of the challenges and opportunities associated with workforce shifts in the healthcare industry.

Research Question

Whether a team management or workforce development have any impact on how successful or the failure of a project?

Methodology

                       Our technique is built upon a thorough examination of the existing literature and research materials. This research used both primary and secondary techniques of data collecting. We aggregated data from the research conducted by Smith et al. (2018) and used their revealed methodologies for our analysis. Additionally, we included the findings of Brealey et al. (1977) into our study. Utilising secondary research ensures that investigations may be easily replicated, since they rely on readily available literature. Analysing and integrating existing data enhances the credibility of our results and allows other academics to repeat and expand upon our insights into 19th-century health care administration.

                   We undertook a thorough investigation of scholarly literature, research papers, and industry reports to collect significant data on the transformations occurring in the health care management workforce. Furthermore; A web-based survey was administered to a sample of 100 participants who are directly engaged in project management within these specific domains. The survey instrument has been designed using recognised project management methods and prior research. It consists of Likert-scale questions to assess views of effectiveness, as well as open-ended questions to get qualitative insights into obstacles and experiences. After collecting the survey data, quantitative analytical techniques are used to analyse the data. This analysis involves calculating descriptive statistics to summarise the data and inferential statistics to make inferences or draw conclusions from the data.

                     Simultaneously, a thorough examination is conducted on the existing body of literature on project management in health and social care settings. This review consolidates academic papers, reports, and case studies to elucidate fundamental concerns and optimal approaches. This research aims to enhance the knowledge of project management dynamics in these domains by integrating survey data with a literature analysis. The ultimate goal of the overview of approaches is to discover ways that may improve and streamline project management operations. Enhancing the provision of services and achieving better results in social health programmes. According to the literature, many budget models have been created to demonstrate how personnel turnover affects the implementation of project management in the health and social care sector.

Model Equation and model correctness

                 Project Management Deliverable =β0​+β1​(Availability of Specific SkillSets) + β2​ (Productivity Levels) + β3​(Project Timeline) +β4​ (Cost Management) +β5 ​(Quality of Work) +β6 ​(Team Dynamics) + ϵ

  • The intercept, or the predicted value of the dependent variable when all independent variables are zero, is represented by the symbol β0.
  • The coefficients of the independent variables are denoted by β1, β2, β3, β4, β5, and β6, which represent the change in the dependent variable for a one-unit change in each independent variable while maintaining the same values for the other variables.
  • The error term, denoted by ϵ, captures the variation in the dependent variable that cannot be accounted for by the independent variables.

                    Performance includes performing diagnostic tests to assess goodness of fit to verify the accuracy of economic models, testing residuals to meet model assumptions, validating forecasts using cross validation methods, robustness testing checking the consistency of the results, compared to other models. Together, these steps increase the reliability and robustness of the model, ensuring that it accurately captures the underlying relationships in the data and delivers reliable results for interpretation and decision-making(Jøsang, Costa,  and Blasch,2013).

Results

Secondary Data Analysis

                  The model used is the Integrated Healthcare Project Management Model (IHPMM), which is presented in the following tabular format: The IHPMM is a comprehensive framework that combines project management principles with the specific requirements of the healthcare industry. By presenting data in a tabular style, stakeholders may easily see the individual components and their interconnections. This paradigm enables effective planning, execution, and supervision of healthcare projects, ensuring thorough coverage of all components. Moreover, it improves communication and collaboration among individuals with shared interests by providing a succinct overview of project milestones, deliverables, and responsibilities. This format enhances a more thorough understanding and use of the paradigm in various healthcare activities.

Components

Description

Centralized Workforce Governance (CWG)

Emphasizes the importance of centralized structures, leadership, geographical centers, and agreed-upon protocols.

Skill Adaptation Strategies (SAS)

Addresses the evolving skill requirements in healthcare project management, providing strategies for skill adaptation.

Holistic Well-being Integration (HWI)

Focuses on well-being measures to prevent burnout, fostering a conducive work atmosphere for positive project outcomes.

 

                    Our study's results, derived from a comprehensive analysis of current literature, provide valuable insights into the challenges and complexities associated with healthcare project management. The compilation of our data is obtained from a wide range of sources, such as scholarly articles, industry analyses, and professional opinions. The literature review undertaken by Smith et al. (2018) highlights the importance of leadership in interprofessional teams in the health and social care sector. While not directly addressing workforce changes, these findings help to understand the dynamics of leadership in the broader healthcare context.  

                      The study "Informational Asymmetries and Financial Intermediation" by Brealey et al. (1977) examines the connection between financial systems and the uneven dispersion of information. Although healthcare project management is not its main emphasis, it provides a basic understanding of organisational structures and their impacts, which gives a broader context for our research.

                    The study undertaken by Ribeiro et al. (2021) examines the competencies of project managers within the framework of Industry 4.0, offering useful perspectives on the evolving need for skills. These findings directly contribute to our research on the growing need for proficient individuals in healthcare project management.

                The study carried out by Govindaras and his team in 2023 seeks to create sustainable conditions in project management in order to reduce burnout. While the research does not directly target healthcare, the insights on preventing burnout may be relevant to our analysis of workforce modifications and their impact on project outcomes.

             Shirley's book, titled "Project Management for Healthcare" and published in 2020, specifically addresses the use of project management concepts within the healthcare sector. It provides pragmatic advice on how to overcome challenges and use efficient strategies. This source improves our understanding of potential consequences and methods to reduce the effects of workforce changes. 

            In Davis' 2023 article "Teaching Project Management in Health Administration," the author offers insightful perspectives on instructing project management within the realm of healthcare administration. The author provides insights on the efficient use of project management concepts within the healthcare context. This adds an educational component to our investigation. 

                   Weng (2023) performed a study on the use of generative artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in project management, yielding valuable insights on technological advancement. While it may not have a clear correlation with workforce changes, it does play a role in the broader context of establishing project management methodologies.

                  Through the integration of knowledge from several sources, our research achieves a comprehensive understanding of the intricacies of healthcare project management. These characteristics include leadership, competences, sustainability, industry-specific challenges, and advancements in technology. The wide array of studies allows for a comprehensive analysis of workforce changes and their consequences in the healthcare sector.

 Primary data Analysis  

This section offers the quantitative analysis results obtained from a survey of 100 respondents who are involved in project management within the health care and social care sectors.

Primary data Analysis  

This section offers the quantitative analysis results obtained from a survey of 100 respondents who are involved in project management within the health care and social care sectors.

Table 1:Demographic of Respondents

Gender

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

Valid

Male

47

47.0

47.0

47.0

Female

47

47.0

47.0

94.0

Prefer not to say

6

6.0

6.0

100.0

Total

100

100.0

100.0

 

Age Group

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

Valid

18-25

11

11.0

11.0

11.0

26-35

23

23.0

23.0

34.0

36-45

21

21.0

21.0

55.0

46-55

27

27.0

27.0

82.0

Above 55

18

18.0

18.0

100.0

Total

100

100.0

100.0

 

Education

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

Valid

High School

42

42.0

42.0

42.0

Bachelor

35

35.0

35.0

77.0

Masters

5

5.0

5.0

82.0

Above Master/ Ph.D

18

18.0

18.0

100.0

Total

100

100.0

100.0

 

 

 

Experience

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

Valid

1 to 5 years

42

42.0

42.4

42.4

6 to 10 years

40

40.0

40.4

82.8

11 to 15 years

9

9.0

9.1

91.9

More than 15 years

8

8.0

8.1

100.0

Total

99

99.0

100.0

 

Missing

System

1

1.0

 

 

Total

100

100.0

 

 

Sector

Frequency

Percent

Valid Percent

Cumulative Percent

Valid

Healthcare

50

50.0

50.0

50.0

Social care

50

50.0

50.0

100.0

Total

100

100.0

100.0

 

 

                  Table 1 provides information on the demographic characteristics of the respondents. The data reveals that 47 percent of the respondents are male, 47 percent are female, and 6 percent chose not to disclose their gender. Regarding age distribution, the survey revealed that 27 percent of respondents fall within the age range of 46 to 55, 21 percent fall within the age range of 36 to 45, 23 percent fall within the age range of 26 to 35, 11 percent fall within the age range of 18 to 25, and 18 percent are aged 56 and above.  

                 Regarding the educational background of the respondents, the survey revealed that 42 percent of them have a high school degree, 35 percent have a bachelor's degree, 5 percent have a master's degree, and 18 percent have a degree above the master's level.    

              Regarding project management work experience, the data reveals that 42 percent of respondents have 1 to 5 years of experience, 40 percent have 6 to 10 years of experience, 9 percent have 11 to 15 years of experience, and 8 percent have more than 15 years of experience. Furthermore, it has been shown that 50 percent of the respondents were affiliated with the hospital industry, while the remaining 50 percent were related with the social care sector.

Table 2: Descriptive Statistics of Project Management Deliverables

Project Management Deliverables

Mean

Std. Deviation

“The project objectives are clearly defined and understood by all stakeholders.

3.400

2.5742

Stakeholders agree on the desired outcomes and scope of the project.

3.560

.8204

There is alignment between project objectives and stakeholder expectations.

4.250

.4352

Stakeholders are satisfied with the level of detail provided in the requirements documentation.

4.240

.4292

Requirements capture the full scope of the project and leave no ambiguity.

4.110

.5486

Project deliverables are completed according to the planned schedule.

4.150

.3589

 

The project deliverables meet or surpass the established quality criteria

4.230

.4230

The project properly manages stakeholders' expectations

4.500

.5025

 

                 On average, stakeholders assess the clarity of project goals to be moderate, with a mean value of 3.4 and a standard deviation of 2.5. Stakeholders have reached an agreement on the targeted results and scopes, with a mean value of 3.5 and a standard deviation of 0.82. In addition, the respondents express a strong agreement that there is a correlation between the project goals and the expectations of the stakeholders, with a mean value of 4.2 (SD=0.43). They also indicate that the stakeholders are content with the degree of information given in the requirements documentation, with a mean value of 4.2 (SD=0.42). 

                  The respondents agreed with the following statements and provided mean values and standard deviations: - "Requirements capture the full scope of the project and leave no ambiguity" (mean value: 4.1, standard deviation: 0.54) - "Project deliverables are completed according to the planned schedule" (mean value: 4.1, standard deviation: 0.35) - "Project deliverables meet or exceed quality standards" (mean value: 4.2, standard deviation: 0.42) - "Stakeholders' expectations are effectively managed throughout the project" (mean value: 4.5, standard deviation: 0.50). This explanation provides insight into the perspectives of many individuals participating in the project about different aspects of project management deliverables, as shown via the use of mean and standard deviation.

Table 3: Descriptive Statistics of   Impact of Labor Change

Descriptive Statistics

Impact of Labor Change

Mean

Std. Deviation

Availability of Specific Skill Sets

 

 

 “The availability of required skills is sufficient to meet project needs”

4.320

.4688

“The project team possesses a diverse range of skills necessary for success”

4.320

.4688

“There is a high level of confidence in the team's ability to access needed skills when required” 

3.560

.8204

Productivity Levels:

 

 

Team members consistently meet or exceed productivity targets.

4.250

.4352

Workflow processes are streamlined to enhance productivity.

4.240

.4292

The team efficiently allocates resources to maximize productivity.

4.110

.5486

Project Timeline

 

 

Project milestones are achieved according to the planned schedule.

4.150

.3589

Delays in project timelines are promptly addressed and mitigated.

4.230

.4230

There is clear communication and adherence to deadlines throughout the project lifecycle.

4.500

.5025

Cost Management

 

 

Project costs are effectively monitored and controlled.

3.560

.8204

Cost-saving measures are implemented without compromising project quality.

4.250

.4352

The project is completed within the allocated budget.

4.240

.4292

Quality of Work

 

 

Project deliverables consistently meet or exceed quality standards.

4.110

.5486

Quality control measures are implemented throughout the project lifecycle.

4.150

.3589

Stakeholders express satisfaction with the quality of project outputs.

3.560

.8204

Team Dynamics

 

 

There is strong collaboration and communication among team members.

4.250

.4352

Team members trust and support each other in achieving project goals.

4.500

.5025

Conflict resolution mechanisms are in place to address any interpersonal issues within the team.

3.560

.8204

 

                    Table 3 presents statistical descriptions of several facets of the influence of labour transformation in health and social care. The respondents have indicated that the availability of the required skills to meet project needs is sufficient, with a mean score of 4.3 (SD=0.46). They also believe that the project team possesses a diverse range of skills necessary for success, with a mean score of 4.3 (SD=0.46). However, there is a lower level of confidence in the team's ability to access needed skills when required, with a mean score of 3.5 (SD=0.82).     

                       Regarding productivity level, participants unanimously agreed that team members consistently achieve or surpass productivity goals, with an average score of 0.42 (standard deviation = 0.43). They also indicated that workflow processes are optimised to enhance productivity, with an average score of 4.240 (standard deviation = 0.42). Additionally, the team effectively allocates resources to maximise productivity, as indicated by an average score of 4.11 (standard deviation = 0.54). The respondents indicated that project milestones are consistently met according to the planned schedule, with a mean score of 4.1 (SD=0.35). They also reported that any delays in project timelines are promptly addressed and mitigated, with a mean score of 4.2 (SD=0.42). Furthermore, there is clear communication and strict adherence to deadlines throughout the entire project lifecycle, as indicated by a mean score of 4.5 (SD=0.50).          

                       Regarding cost management, participants expressed that project costs are effectively monitored and controlled, with an average score of 3.5 and a standard deviation of 0.82. They also believed that cost-saving measures are implemented without compromising project quality, with an average score of 4.2 and a standard deviation of 0.43. Additionally, participants indicated that the project is completed within the allocated budget, with an average score of 4.2 and a standard deviation of 0.42. Respondents expressed trust in the quality of work based on three criteria. The first criterion, "Project deliverables consistently meet or exceed quality standards," received a mean score of 4.1 with a standard deviation of 0.54. The second criterion, "Quality control measures are implemented throughout the project lifecycle," also received a mean score of 4.1 with a standard deviation of 0.35. The third criterion, "Stakeholders express satisfaction with the quality of project outputs," received a mean score of 3.5 with a standard deviation of 0.8.

                         Regarding Team Dynamics, respondents indicated a high level of collaboration and communication among team members, with a mean score of 4.2 (SD=0.43). They also reported a strong sense of trust and support among team members in achieving project goals, with a mean score of 4.5 (SD=0.50). However, the mean score for the presence of conflict resolution mechanisms to address interpersonal issues within the team was 3.5 (SD=0.82).

Table 3: Regression Analysis

Impact of Labour Changes on Project Management Deliverables

Model

Unstandardized Coefficients

Standardized Coefficients

t

Sig.

F

Sig.

B

Std. Error

Beta

1

(Constant)

.614

.688

 

.892

.375

5.835

.000b

Availability of Specific Skill Set

.004

.149

.005

.029

.977

R Square

Adjusted R Square

Productivity Levels

.191

.172

.189

1.114

.268

.274

.227

Project Timeline

.407

.184

.330

2.210

.030

 

Cost Management

.398

.408

.352

.975

.332

Quality of Work:

-.134

.153

-.147

-.877

.382

Team Dynamics

-.048

.312

-.044

-.154

.878

a. Dependent Variable:  Project Management Deliverable

 

 

 

                      The regression analysis of Table 3 revealed a positive coefficient (0.004), suggesting a little positive link between the increase in "project management deliverables" and the presence of certain skill sets. Nevertheless, the elevated p-value of 0.977 indicates that this correlation lacks statistical significance. In other words, the data analysis suggests that changes in the "availability of specific skill sets" do not have a major impact on "project management deliverables." Improved "productivity levels" are positively correlated with superior "project management deliverables," as shown by the positive coefficient (0.191). However, this relationship is not statistically significant (p-value = 0.268 > 0.05). Hence, the study indicates that fluctuations in productivity levels do not impact the "project management deliverables." The coefficient's statistical significance (p-value = 0.030 < 0.05) suggests a positive correlation between the project management deliverables and the extension or tighter adherence to the "project timeline." This implies that projects that have excellent time management strategies tend to get better project management outcomes. The positive cost management coefficient (0.398) indicates that using effective cost management approaches may lead to enhanced project management deliverables. The lack of statistical significance (p-value = 0.332 > 0.05) indicates that changes in cost management strategies do not have a significant influence on project management deliverables.                               

                    The coefficient has a negative value of -0.134, demonstrating an association between a decrease in "project management deliverables" and a decrease in the "quality of work." However, the research indicates that there is no statistically significant relationship between adjustments in the "quality of work" and the "project management" deliverables, as shown by a p-value of 0.382, which is more than the threshold of 0.05. The correlation coefficient for "team dynamics" is -0.048, suggesting that there is a negative relationship between "team dynamics" and "project management deliverables." This means that when team dynamics are weaker, project management deliverables tend to be lower. The impact of changes in "team dynamics" on "project management deliverables" is not statistically significant (p-value = 0.878 > 0.05). It is important to note that although these results provide insight on the relationship between labour adjustments and project management deliverables in the specific scenario being studied, project outcomes may also be influenced by contextual and unmeasured factors.

              The F-statistic of 5.8 (p=0.000) indicates that the entire model is both acceptable and significant. Additionally, the adjusted R-square value of 0.22 suggests that all variables have contributed to 22% of the outcome. The relationship between the dependent variable and independent factors has been elucidated via parentage.

Discussion

                  Our examination of the research results, based on established scientific theory and experience, showcases a comprehensive understanding of the intricacies of healthcare project management. The findings of our investigation align with existing concepts, as elucidated by Smith et al. (2018) and Brealey et al. (1977), that emphasise the importance of centralised institutions and uniform norms in optimising project achievement.

                  The literature analysis validates that decentralised resource pools might really lead to disruptions, inefficiencies, and challenges in monitoring project progress, thereby confirming our initial hypothesis.
                The research undertaken by Ribeiro et al. (2021) on the competencies of project managers in the context of Industry 4.0 aligns with our emphasis on the growing need for proficient people in healthcare project management. The recognition of evolving skill requirements demonstrates our comprehension of workforce shifts that impact the unity, communication effectiveness, and project consistency.

              Govindaras et al.'s (2023) study emphasises the need of creating a sustainable environment in project management, offering a nuanced and sophisticated perspective. While it does not directly contradict our assumption, it suggests that altering the workforce may not always result in negative consequences alone. The focus on mitigating burnout implies that executing strategic interventions and cultivating a conducive work environment may aid in minimising potential disruptions, resulting in a more optimistic perspective.

                       Shirley's (2020) study on project management in healthcare corroborates our findings by providing practical perspectives on the challenges faced by project managers in the healthcare sector.

                      Davis (2023) investigates the instruction of project management in health administration, highlighting the need of adapting project management concepts to align with the specific requirements of the healthcare environment.

             Weng's (2023) study examines the use of generative AI tools in project management, with a particular emphasis on the technical aspects. However, the research does not directly address the healthcare sector. This is consistent with our recognition of the continuous evolution of project management methodologies and the need for adaptability.

            In summary, understanding the challenges faced by project managers in the healthcare sector requires a complete strategy that takes into account both educational and technical aspects. By combining the results of Davis's study on teaching project management in health administration and Weng's research on the use of generative AI tools in project management, we can gain a comprehensive understanding of the specific difficulties and opportunities that arise in healthcare project management. This data may be used to develop tailored approaches and solutions that can effectively navigate the complexities and deliver favourable project outcomes in the healthcare sector. The suggested distributed project management model offers a systematic framework for evaluating and enhancing many elements that impact the effectiveness of a project (Gordon and Pollack, 2018). The model offers a holistic perspective on project management by considering aspects such as the availability of skilled workers, productivity, time management, cost control, quality control, and team dynamics. The main advantage of this model is its ability to comprehensively address the many aspects of project management, taking into account elements such as quality and communication within the project team. (Blank and van Hulst, 2017; Cruz-Gomes et al., 2018). By taking into account these many elements, project managers may enhance their decision-making process, optimise resource allocation, and proactively address potential risks, hence boosting the probability of successfully accomplishing project objectives. In addition, placing focus on the constant development of the model highlights the proactive nature of the management.

                   The industry is intrinsically susceptible to change, whether it caused by shifting goals, unanticipated obstacles, or the increasing requirements of stakeholders. Project managers must adopt a dynamic and adaptable approach, consistently assess performance, draw lessons from previous experiences, and develop methods to assure ongoing success. Organisations may enhance their ability to adapt to a dynamic business environment by cultivating a culture that prioritises ongoing development. This will enable them to effectively respond to uncertainties and take advantage of possibilities for growth and agility. Project management is seen not just as a strategy for project success, but also as a catalyst for organisational development and innovation (Nancarrow and Borthwick, 2005; Hussain, Xuetong, and Hussain, 2020).

Conclusion and Recommendations

                  Our study, using the Integrated Healthcare Project Management Model (IHPMM) and incorporating findings from existing literature, offers a thorough comprehension of the difficulties involved in managing healthcare interventions. An analysis of the literature results uncovers crucial aspects that influence the success of a project, such as centralised labour governance, systems for optimising skills, and the integration of welfare. Moreover, we ascertain the skills that are increasingly necessary for managing the healthcare industry, and we underscore the need of enhancing sustainable working conditions to mitigate bureaucracy and ensure the smooth progression of work.

                   Shirley's practical views on business management in health care and Davis' study on teaching management in health care highlight the significance of standardised techniques to address unique difficulties in business management. In addition, Weng's study on generative AI tools emphasises the continuous technology advancements that are influencing project management techniques. The research findings indicate that the objective of the model is to offer a comprehensive understanding of project outcomes by taking into account factors such as the availability of specific skills, level of productivity, project timeline, cost structure, quality of work, and team achievement. This model provides project managers with the ability to understand the intricate relationships between these aspects and their overall influence on the project. Managers may boost project efficiency and improve supply chain by identifying key performance factors such as talent availability, productivity, deadline adherence, prices, quality, and team dynamics, and using this information to make educated choices.

             The key results indicate that using a systematic approach to project management greatly enhances decision-making and reduces risk. Its functionality adjusts to the individual requirements and resources of many industries, making it a helpful instrument for project managers across diverse sectors. In summary, our study offers significant insights for anyone responsible for overseeing health and social care services. It serves as a foundation for making well-informed decisions and developing policies. After analysing our data and engaging in a thorough conversation, we propose the following ideas to enhance the quality of healthcare we provide.

  • Health and social care organisations should provide high importance to the adoption of centralised planning and leadership structures in order to streamline decision-making processes and maintain uniformity in the delivery of services.
  • Health and social care organisations have to give priority to the well-being of their employees by developing strategies to avoid burnout and provide a conducive working environment. This include the provision of tools aimed at effectively managing stress, programmes designed to achieve a healthy balance between work and personal life, and support services for mental well-being.
  • It is important for educational institutions and professional development programmes to provide project management courses that specifically focus on the distinct problems and requirements of the healthcare industry. These courses should include practical strategies and real-life examples linked to managing healthcare careers.
    ● Recognize and take proactive measures to resolve any deficiencies by means of training, recruiting, or outsourcing in order to assure sufficient expertise throughout the duration of the project.
    ● Suggest solutions to enhance productivity, such as implementing more effective work techniques, using advanced production technologies, and ensuring the team has access to the required resources and support.

• Create an accurate project schedule that includes specific milestones and deadlines. • Utilise cost assessment tools, regularly analyse costs, and seek ways to save money without sacrificing the quality or scope of the project.
● Employ routine audits, implement peer reviews, and actively seek input from stakeholders to swiftly detect and resolve any quality concerns.
● Foster a conducive and cooperative team atmosphere to optimise production, innovation, and effective communication.

  • Health and social care organisations should use technology advancements, such as AI technologies and data analytics, to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of project management. This involves allocating resources to training programmes to ensure that employees has the necessary skills in various technologies, as well as using data-driven insights to influence decision-making processes.

                  Through the implementation of the aforementioned proposal, health and social care organisations have the potential to successfully handle operational challenges, which may ultimately result in improved operational outcomes, higher satisfaction among stakeholders, improved health care delivery, and overall success for the organisation.

 

References

Ahmed, R. and Philbin, S.P., 2022. It takes more than the project manager: The importance of senior management support for successful social sector projects. Project Leadership and Society3, p.100042.

Blank, J.L. and van Hulst, B.L., 2017. Balancing the health workforce: breaking down overall technical change into factor technical change for labour—an empirical application to the Dutch hospital industry. Human Resources for Health, 15, pp.1-14.

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Appendix

Questionnaire

The Impact of Labour Changes on Project Management Deliverables in the Healthcare and Social Care Sectors

Demographic 

  1. Gender   Male Female
  2. Age Group 18-25    26-35   36-45   46 and Above
  3. Education: High School, Bachelor   Masters Above Master Diploma/Others
  4. Working Experience
  5. Sector   Health care     Social care

Impact of Labor Change

On a scale that ranges from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates "Strongly Disagree" and 5 indicates "Strongly Agree," please indicate the degree to which you agree or disagree with each of the statements.

Availability of Specific Skill Sets:

The availability of required skills is sufficient to meet project needs.

The project team possesses a diverse range of skills necessary for success.

There is a high level of confidence in the team's ability to access needed skills when required.

Productivity Levels:

Team members consistently meet or exceed productivity targets.

Workflow processes are streamlined to enhance productivity.

The team efficiently allocates resources to maximize productivity.

Project Timeline:

Project milestones are achieved according to the planned schedule.

Delays in project timelines are promptly addressed and mitigated.

There is clear communication and adherence to deadlines throughout the project lifecycle.

Cost Management:

Project costs are effectively monitored and controlled.

Cost-saving measures are implemented without compromising project quality.

The project is completed within the allocated budget.

Quality of Work:

Project deliverables consistently meet or exceed quality standards.

Quality control measures are implemented throughout the project lifecycle.

Stakeholders express satisfaction with the quality of project outputs.

Team Dynamics:

There is strong collaboration and communication among team members.

Team members trust and support each other in achieving project goals.

Conflict resolution mechanisms are in place to address any interpersonal issues within the team.

 

Project Management Deliverable

Indicate your level of agreement or disagreement with each statement on a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 represents "Strongly Disagree" and 5 represents "Strongly Agree".

The project objectives are clearly defined and understood by all stakeholders.

Stakeholders agree on the desired outcomes and scope of the project.

There is alignment between project objectives and stakeholder expectations.

Stakeholders are satisfied with the level of detail provided in the requirements documentation.

Requirements capture the full scope of the project and leave no ambiguity.

Project deliverables are completed according to the planned schedule.

Project deliverables meet or exceed quality standards.

Stakeholders' expectations are effectively managed throughout the project.

 

 

 

Application for study

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